Cathedral of Beauvais, France


General Attributes
DOI10.26301/y75k-5550
Project NameCathedral of Beauvais
CountryFrance
StatusPublished
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Spatial DataDownload (Links to all available data types will be emailed)
Data Bounds (approx.)

Data Types

Data Type Size Device Name Device Type
LiDAR - TerrestrialN/A GBCyrax 2500 Time of Flight Scanner
Background
Site DescriptionUpon its completion in 1247, the twice collapsed and rebuilt Cathedral of Saint-Pierre of Beauvais boasted the tallest choir ever built in Europe, and is still one of the most daring feats in Gothic architecture. Like many gothic cathedrals, the one in Beauvais was designed in the shape of a cross. The 47.5 meter tall nave is interrupted by a transept, which would have separated the pews from the choir and apse. The interior is lavishly decorated with stained glass windows, an intricately carved wooden altarpiece, and a functioning medieval clock.
Project DescriptionIn 2001, a team of art historians and computer scientists from Columbia University traveled to France to create an accurate 3-D model of the Cathedral of Beauvais. They sought to analyze the building’s structure and assist historic preservation efforts. Gale-force winds off the English channel constantly strain the cathedral's flying buttresses, which threaten to collapse. However, LiDAR scans made with a Cyrax 2500 enabled the team to accurately document the site and create models for structural analysis.
Additional InformationLearn more
Collection Date0000-00-00 to 0000-00-00
Publication Date2021-04-20
License TypeCC BY-NC-SA
Entities
ContributorsN/A
CollectorsColumbia University, Department of Computer Science
FundersN/A
PartnersN/A
Site AuthorityN/A
Citation
2021: Cathedral of Beauvais - LiDAR - Terrestrial . Collected by Columbia University, Department of Computer Science . Distributed by Open Heritage 3D. https://doi.org/10.26301/y75k-5550

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